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Hand Sewing

Simple hand repair to a seam or hem

Simple hand repair to a seam or hem
Getting started:

Use a ‘tailor’s measure’ of thread (this is a length of thread from shoulder to hand)
Either knot at the end to prevent the thread coming through all the layers or bring the needle through the layers of fabric, repeat then put the needle through the loop you have created. This will secure or ‘anchor’ the thread.
For a rip we suggest back stitching (a stronger stitch used for sewing or mending seams or hemming) the opening then whip stitching the edge to finish it off.

Directions:

  1. Turn garment inside out, so the seam allowance and mend is visible.
  2. Measure thread, thread needle (single thread with knot at the bottom) or anchor the stitch on the garment.
  3. Get rid of any loose threads. Start on the good stitching before the hole. Anchor the thread, overstitch a couple of times to secure. Keep your needle on top of the fabric, this makes it easier. Use the puncture holes form the previous stitching if possible.
  4. Working from right to left, push the needle thorough all fabric layers to anchor the stitch on the wrong side of the fabric. Then move your needle over 5mm to the right of the anchoring point and push the needle through the layers and back up to where the end of the stitch is, pulling the thread taut.
  5. One side will have threads overlapping and one side will be a line of small dashes.
  6. Repeat all the way until you have sewn up the hole.
  7. Finish on the good stitching and anchor off the thread in the same way as you began. Cut the thread and hey presto! Your garment is ready to wear again.
  8. Anchor the stitch on the good stitching. Bring the thread over the raw edges and push the needle from the back to the front at an angle. Repeat all along the frayed edge. Finish on the good stitching and anchor the thread off to secure.

Simple hand repair to a seam or hem

Simple hand repair to a seam or hem
Getting started:

Use a ‘tailor’s measure’ of thread (this is a length of thread from shoulder to hand)
Either knot at the end to prevent the thread coming through all the layers or bring the needle through the layers of fabric, repeat then put the needle through the loop you have created. This will secure or ‘anchor’ the thread.
For a rip we suggest back stitching (a stronger stitch used for sewing or mending seams or hemming) the opening then whip stitching the edge to finish it off.

Directions:

  1. Turn garment inside out, so the seam allowance and mend is visible.
  2. Measure thread, thread needle (single thread with knot at the bottom) or anchor the stitch on the garment.
  3. Working from right to left, push the needle thorough all fabric layers to anchor the stitch on the wrong side of the fabric. Then move your needle over 5mm to the right of the anchoring point and push the needle through the layers and back up to where the end of the stitch is, pulling the thread taut.
  4. One side will have threads overlapping and one side will be a line of small dashes.
  5. Repeat all the way until you have sewn up the hole.
  6. Finish on the good stitching and anchor off the thread in the same way as you began. Cut the thread and hey presto! Your garment is ready to wear again.
  7. Anchor the stitch on the good stitching. Bring the thread over the raw edges and push the needle from the back to the front at an angle. Repeat all along the frayed edge. Finish on the good stitching and anchor the thread off to secure.


Sewing on a button

Sewing on a button
Getting started:

Sewing on a button with a thread shank will be a permanent solution and the safest way to mend baby clothes, allowing strength and movement.

Directions:

  1. Use double thread – tailor’s measure x2 then thread the loop end of the thread through the eye of the needle. This will make a super strong thread which you can anchor neatly.
  2. Anchor the stitch where the button fell off – working on top of the garment, push the needle through the fabric and before you pull the thread all the way through, bring the needle through the thread loop that is already there – this will secure the stitch neatly. Repeat to make it super secure.
  3. Drop the button over the needle.
  4. Place a kirby grip over the button and stitch over, sewing through the button holes and looping the thread around the kirby from front to back.
  5. Follow the stitching design of the other buttons.
  6. Stitch over the kirby at least 3 times, up through the button hole and back to the reverse of the garment. Leave the needle on the underside of the garment.
  7. Remove the kirby grip. There should be some space between the garment and the button.
  8. Bring the needle up between the garment and the button.
  9. Loop the thread around the threads underneath the button, creating a shank. Do this at least 3 times.
  10. Loop the thread around the button again and this time bring the needle through the thread loop to create a knot. Repeat a couple of times.
  11. Bring the needle through the garment under the button and sew a little stitch and secure with the needle through the loop. Repeat.
  12. To hide the thread, push the needle through the garment layers, if possible, and bring the needle up further along. Cut the thread. This will hide any loose ends. Tada!

Sewing on a button

Sewing on a button
Getting started:

Sewing on a button with a thread shank will be a permanent solution and the safest way to mend baby clothes, allowing strength and movement.

Directions:

  1. Use double thread – tailor’s measure x2 then thread the loop end of the thread through the eye of the needle. This will make a super strong thread which you can anchor neatly.
  2. Anchor the stitch where the button fell off – working on top of the garment, push the needle through the fabric and before you pull the thread all the way through, bring the needle through the thread loop that is already there – this will secure the stitch neatly. Repeat to make it super secure.
  3. Drop the button over the needle.
  4. Place a kirbyr grip over the button and stitch over, sewing through the button holes and looping the thread around the kirby from front to back.
  5. Follow the stitching design of the other buttons.
  6. Stitch over the kirby at least 3 times, up through the button hole and back to the reverse of the garment. Leave the needle on the underside of the garment.
  7. Remove the kirby grip. There should be some space between the garment and the button.
  8. Bring the needle up between the garment and the button.
  9. Loop the thread around the threads underneath the button, creating a shank. Do this at least 3 times.
  10. Loop the thread around the button again and this time bring the needle through the thread loop to create a knot. Repeat a couple of times.
  11. Bring the needle through the garment under the button and sew a little stitch and secure with the needle through the loop. Repeat.
  12. To hide the thread, push the needle through the garment layers, if possible, and bring the needle up further along. Cut the thread. This will hide any loose ends. Tada!


Alternative mending option for fraying appliqués

Alternative mending option for fraying appliqués
Getting started:

Styles with complicated appliqués may fray a little as part of their regular wear and tear in the wash or when worn. An easy solution may be to personalise the style making it unique rather than trying to stitch a frayed edge. Directions:

  1. With some sharp scissors, snip close to the edge of the fabric to remove the appliqué.
  2. We took all the top windows out of the bus rather than mend one that was falling off – we think it looks just as good!

Alternative mending option for fraying appliqués

Alternative mending option for fraying appliqués
Getting started:

Styles with complicated appliqués may fray a little as part of their regular wear and tear in the wash or when worn. An easy solution may be to personalise the style making it unique rather than trying to stitch a frayed edge. Directions:

  1. With some sharp scissors, snip close to the edge of the fabric to remove the appliqué.
  2. We took all the top windows out of the bus rather than mend one that was falling off – we think it looks just as good!


Quick fix to a fallen hem using hemming tape

Quick fix to a fallen hem using hemming tape
Getting started

Hemming tape is brilliant to have in your sewing box. It is a quick fix to help put a hem or similar back in place – great for an emergency repair!

Directions:

  1. Measure the amount needed against the dropped hem.
  2. Trim down the tape, if needed, to fit the area you want to mend.
  3. Place the tape in between the layers, fold the fabric over the top and press with an iron. Make sure your iron is set to the correct temperature for your fabric.
  4. Iron until the fabric is fixed back into place.
  5. You could also sew the hem in place to make it really secure but this will hold for a few washes.

Quick fix to a fallen hem using hemming tape

Quick fix to a fallen hem using hemming tape
Getting started

Hemming tape is brilliant to have in your sewing box. It is a quick fix to help put a hem or similar back in place – great for an emergency repair!

Directions:

  1. Measure the amount needed against the dropped hem.
  2. Trim down the tape, if needed, to fit the area you want to mend.
  3. Place the tape in between the layers, fold the fabric over the top and press with an iron. Make sure your iron is set to the correct temperature for your fabric.
  4. Iron until the fabric is fixed back into place.
  5. You could also sew the hem in place to make it really secure but this will hold for a few washes.


Removing bobbling or pilling from your knitwear

Removing bobbling or pilling from your knitwear
Getting started:

Almost all knitwear will bobble at some stage. Some super soft knits will bobble sooner, but this is part of the nature of the fabric and not a fault.

Directions:

  1. Bobbling can easily be removed by chopping off the bobbles with some small scissors or using a basic razor – no fancy razors with soap attached!
  2. Put something solid underneath the garment and bring the razor down in long strokes over the fabric just shaving off the fuzzy bits. Follow the weave of the knit.
  3. The bobbles will collect at the bottom. Just brush them off and repeat until your garment is fuzz-free.
Alternatives: You could also use a de-bobbling machine – they are usually battery operated and perform the same function, or you can use a cashmere comb. But we find the razor solution cheap and easy to use – just be careful!


Removing bobbling or pilling from your knitwear

Removing bobbling or pilling from your knitwear
Getting started:

Almost all knitwear will bobble at some stage. Some super soft knits will bobble sooner, but this is part of the nature of the fabric and not a fault.

Directions:

  1. Bobbling can easily be removed by chopping off the bobbles with some small scissors or using a basic razor – no fancy razors with soap attached!
  2. Put something solid underneath the garment and bring the razor down in long strokes over the fabric just shaving off the fuzzy bits. Follow the weave of the knit.
  3. The bobbles will collect at the bottom. Just brush them off and repeat until your garment is fuzz-free.
  4. Alternatives: You could also use a de-bobbling machine – they are usually battery operated and perform the same function, or you can use a cashmere comb. But we find the razor solution cheap and easy to use – just be careful!



Patching a hole

Patching a hole
Getting started:

We used a small running stitch but you could use Whip or Backstitch

Directions:

  1. When patching, you need to cover the rip from the inside or outside – depending on your preference. Find a patch from some scrap fabric or you can buy appliqué patches that you simply iron on, then you can over-stitch to secure.
  2. Cut the patch 2cm bigger than the rip all the way around – use pinking shears (if you have some) around the edge to stop fraying and add detail, or just tuck the edges of the patch underneath as you sew around it.
  3. Using hemming tape secure the patch first before you stitch – this makes it a little easier. Iron it to secure.
  4. Double your thread (single thread doubled over with a knot at the end) and bring the needle and thread through the inside of the garment so your needle is coming through the patch.
  5. Anchor the stitch to secure. Using a running stitch, keeping the needle on top of the patch at all times, pick up the patch and the garment and work the needle along the patch keeping the stitches even. You will be sewing through the garment and the patch. Stitch all the way around and finish in the same way.
  6. Poke the needle to the back of the garment, anchor the stitch to secure and snip off.

Patching a hole

Patching a hole
Getting started:

We used a small running stitch but you could use Whip or Backstitch

Directions:

  1. When patching, you need to cover the rip from the inside or outside – depending on your preference. Find a patch from some scrap fabric or you can buy appliqué patches that you simply iron on, then you can over-stitch to secure.
  2. Cut the patch 2cm bigger than the rip all the way around – use pinking shears (if you have some) around the edge to stop fraying and add detail, or just tuck the edges of the patch underneath as you sew around it.
  3. Using hemming tape secure the patch first before you stitch – this makes it a little easier. Iron it to secure.
  4. Double your thread (single thread doubled over with a knot at the end) and bring the needle and thread through the inside of the garment so your needle is coming through the patch.
  5. Anchor the stitch to secure. Using a running stitch, keeping the needle on top of the patch at all times, pick up the patch and the garment and work the needle along the patch keeping the stitches even. You will be sewing through the garment and the patch. Stitch all the way around and finish in the same way.
  6. Poke the needle to the back of the garment, anchor the stitch to secure and snip off.




Darning a hole in knitwear

Darning a hole in knitwear
Getting started:

Try to use similar thread or wool to what you are darning so that it has the same flexibility. A darning needle is also useful. This is a thicker needle with a round top to go through the knit easier. We have used a regular sewing needle on this example. Having a mending mushroom is handy but not essential.

Directions:

  1. Work on the inside of the garment.
  2. Start outside the hole using a single thread and weave the needle in between the weave of the knit going over the hole horizontally. Gently pull the threads and bring the hole together, but you don’t want it to pull or pucker. Repeat all the way along the hole so you’ll have a series of lines.
  3. Once you have gone over the hole one way, you want to do the same technique going in a vertical direction, picking up the threads that you have just made. This will bring the hole together and almost mimic the weave of the fabric with the thread.
  4. Check how it looks from the outside as you go through the mend. Finish off with an anchor stitch.

Darning a hole in knitwear

Darning a hole in knitwear
Getting started:

Try to use similar thread or wool to what you are darning so that it has the same flexibility. A darning needle is also useful. This is a thicker needle with a round top to go through the knit easier. We have used a regular sewing needle on this example. Having a mending mushroom is handy but not essential.

Directions:

  1. Work on the inside of the garment.
  2. Start outside the hole using a single thread and weave the needle in between the weave of the knit going over the hole horizontally. Gently pull the threads and bring the hole together, but you don’t want it to pull or pucker. Repeat all the way along the hole so you’ll have a series of lines.
  3. Once you have gone over the hole one way, you want to do the same technique going in a vertical direction, picking up the threads that you have just made. This will bring the hole together and almost mimic the weave of the fabric with the thread.
  4. Check how it looks from the outside as you go through the mend. Finish off with an anchor stitch.