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Machine Sewing

Extra strong mend for high-stress seams

Extra strong mend for high-stress seams
Getting started:

Remember to backstitch/back tack/reverse stitch at the beginning and at the end to secure.

Directions:

  1. Thread your machine in a complementary thread colour.
  2. Cut off any loose thread.
  3. If the rip is broken on a few seams, like the crotch, sew up two opposite seams first. Use a straight stitch, remembering to back stitch on the good stitching and finishing on the good stitching with a back stitch.
  4. Sew the hole up.
  5. Once the hole is stitched up, you need to do an overlocking/edge finishing stitch to stop the fabric from fraying.
  6. Use the zigzag stitch on your machine and place the raw edge in the middle of the foot so the needle goes in the fabric and drops off the end, catching the raw edges of the fabric.

Extra strong mend for high-stress seams

Extra strong mend for high-stress seams
Getting started:

Remember to backstitch/back tack/reverse stitch at the beginning and at the end to secure.

Directions:

  1. Thread your machine in a complementary thread colour.
  2. Cut off any loose thread.
  3. If the rip is broken on a few seams, like the crotch, sew up two opposite seams first. Use a straight stitch, remembering to back stitch on the good stitching and finishing on the good stitching with a back stitch.
  4. Sew the hole up.
  5. Once the hole is stitched up, you need to do an overlocking/edge finishing stitch to stop the fabric from fraying.
  6. Use the zigzag stitch on your machine and place the raw edge in the middle of the foot so the needle goes in the fabric and drops off the end, catching the raw edges of the fabric.



Mend an appliqué

Mend an appliqué
Directions:

  1. Thread your machine in a complementary colour.
  2. Use a sample bit of fabric first, and mimic the stitch that is visible if necessary.
  3. Alternatively, set your machine to a stitch that is going to secure the patch back in place.
  4. We used a straight stitch and sewed along the edge of the tight zigzag stitching. This secured the patch in place.
  5. Make sure you aren’t stitching any other layers that might creep under while you are sewing and you are just sewing the broken bit onto the garment!

Mend an appliqué

Mend an appliqué
Directions:

  1. Thread your machine in a complementary colour.
  2. Use a sample bit of fabric first, and mimic the stitch that is visible if necessary.
  3. Alternatively, set your machine to a stitch that is going to secure the patch back in place.
  4. We used a straight stitch and sewed along the edge of the tight zigzag stitching. This secured the patch in place.
  5. Make sure you aren’t stitching any other layers that might creep under while you are sewing and you are just sewing the broken bit onto the garment!


Patching a hole

Patching a hole
Getting started:

If it’s not possible to get it under the machine, hand stitch using a backstitch or running stitch, or patch from the front to cover or secure the rip.

Directions:

  1. When you have a rip, you want to secure the fabric where the threads are weak. If patching on the inside, use some mending or hemming tape with some fabric to secure the back before sewing from the front to secure.
  2. Using the straight stitch on your machine, sew over the rip in the opposite direction of the rip then reverse back up at an angle.
  3. Repeat until you have sewn over the hole.

Patching a hole

Patching a hole
Getting started:

If it’s not possible to get it under the machine, hand stitch using a backstitch or running stitch, or patch from the front to cover or secure the rip.

Directions:

  1. When you have a rip, you want to secure the fabric where the threads are weak. If patching on the inside, use some mending or hemming tape with some fabric to secure the back before sewing from the front to secure.
  2. Using the straight stitch on your machine, sew over the rip in the opposite direction of the rip then reverse back up at an angle.
  3. Repeat until you have sewn over the hole.


Prolong the life of your sleepsuit by cutting off the feet

Prolong the life of your sleepsuit by cutting off the feet
Getting started:

If your little one has grown out of their sleepsuit, you can get some more wear by cutting the feet off and re-hemming to make it last a bit longer.

If your sleepsuit is made from jersey (stretchy fabric) you want to use your machine on a slight zigzag stitch so the stitch stretches with the fabric. Alternatively, use a twin needle on woven fabrics.

If your sleepsuit has buttons down the leg you might be limited by space so it all depends on what method you use as you may not have much hem to play with

Directions:

  1. Cut off the feet.
  2. Fold the raw edge underneath to the wrong side of the fabric.
  3. Do a tester on the foot you have chopped off to make sure your machine is on the correct stitch, a slight zigzag for movement or use a full zig zag for a bit of detail.
  4. Sew the hem in place. The fabric may be a bit tricky especially if there is only a small hem and a small hole but do a bit, folding and sewing a bit at a time.
  5. Reverse stitch at the beginning and the end. Using a twin needle gives a lovely look on the outside and the bobbing will create the zigzag so that the stitch will stretch. Hey presto – no more tight little toes!

Prolong the life of your sleepsuit by cutting off the feet

Prolong the life of your sleepsuit by cutting off the feet
Getting started:

If your little one has grown out of their sleepsuit, you can get some more wear by cutting the feet off and re-hemming to make it last a bit longer.

If your sleepsuit is made from jersey (stretchy fabric) you want to use your machine on a slight zigzag stitch so the stitch stretches with the fabric. Alternatively, use a twin needle on woven fabrics.

If your sleepsuit has buttons down the leg you might be limited by space so it all depends on what method you use as you may not have much hem to play with

Directions:

  1. Cut off the feet.
  2. Fold the raw edge underneath to the wrong side of the fabric.
  3. Do a tester on the foot you have chopped off to make sure your machine is on the correct stitch, a slight zigzag for movement or use a full zig zag for a bit of detail.
  4. Sew the hem in place. The fabric may be a bit tricky especially if there is only a small hem and a small hole but do a bit, folding and sewing a bit at a time.
  5. Reverse stitch at the beginning and the end. Using a twin needle gives a lovely look on the outside and the bobbing will create the zigzag so that the stitch will stretch. Hey presto – no more tight little toes!